I get rid of those pesky animals that get in your house. Nationwide call: 1-888-488-1415

  • Animal Control Posts

  • Why do squirrels come to my house?

    Squirrels enter human homes looking for shelter, food, warmth, and a nice place to raise their young. They are not usually aggressive and do not enter homes looking to attack people. They just want free rent! It is possible for squirrels to carry rabies and other diseases, but that is not often the case. Most rabies cases come from bats. If you or someone you love has a squirrel problem, click here.
  • Meta

Posts Tagged ‘health risks’

2-year old boy sucks on dead bat

Posted by animalcontrol on September 15, 2010

This is not the Sugarhouse bat in the news article; it is a bat that was removed during a bat control job by United Wildlife.

A news story came out yesterday about a boy in Sugarhouse, UT (near Salt Lake City) where a young boy was found sucking on a dead bat.  A brain sample will be taken from the bat and tested for rabies. 

This is bat season in Utah and in many other states!  It is very important not to touch a bat, even a dead bat; the health risks are just too great. 

If you have bats in your attic, give us a call and ask for United Wildlife Bat Removal Services: 1-888-488-1415.  We also remove dead bats and provide clean-up of guano (bat poop).

Read the full story here:

2-year old boy sucks on dead bat.

Advertisements

Posted in Bat Control, Wildlife Control | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Bat Extermination in Denver, Colorado

Posted by animalcontrol on August 3, 2009

exclusion

How do you get rid of bats without exterminating them? Through venting and exclusion.

People in the Denver, Colorado area request bat extermination or attempt do-it-yourself bat extermination usually because of an irrational fear—too many horror movies will get people to worrying about bats and what they might do.  

Now, don’t get me wrong.  I am not sharing my home with these animals either, but not because I am afraid they will suck my blood or turn into vampires. I don’t want to share my home with bats because I don’t want to live with the smell (old, sweaty gerbils) or guano or bat bugs or histoplasmosis or anything else that comes along with them. 

So, how do you get rid of bats without exterminating them?  There is a great option available:  venting and exclusion.  The animals are trained out of the attic or wherever they are living and then not allowed to return.  The colony will find a new roost, often within 24-hours, and then the clean-up can begin.  Depending on how long the animals have lived in your home or business, it can take a few hours or several days.  Generally, it is best to act as soon as possible when you learn you are sharing your home with any wild animal.

It sounds pretty easy here, but getting rid of bats isn’t easy.  It takes special equipment and knowledge, as well as a healthy respect for the animals and a tolerance for high places.  It might sound easier and cheaper to go for do-it-yourself bat extermination and just spray a bunch of poison into your attic and hope for the best, but that is when the real life horror movie will begin.  Sick and dying animals will invade your home trying to flee.  They become disoriented and confused.  

If you try a different method and the usual exits are blocked while they are inside they will scatter throughout the building trying to find an exit.  If they are blocked out while their young are inside they will show great determination trying to get back to them. 

Either way, if you are successful in your attempt at bat extermination, you will have an attic full of rotting bat corpses. Is that really an improvement over what you had in the first place?  

Avoid all this and don’t try bat extermination.  Hire a wildlife removal professional who will leave the animals alive and free to keeping doing what they do best and you will be left in peace to go watch a movie—maybe you should make it a romantic comedy this time?!

Nationwide Bat Removal: 1-888-488-1415

Posted in Bat Control | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Flying Rats (AKA Pigeons) in Salt Lake City, UT

Posted by animalcontrol on July 6, 2009

pigeon

Pigeon control will reduce the health risks imposed by pigeon droppings.

When I tell people I am looking for pigeon control options, they often say things like “but pigeons are cute” and “what did the pigeon to do you?”  Well, one of my children has asthma and that makes it very serious. 

We live in an apartment building in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Pigeons like to roost on the roof of the complex.  The problem, besides the noise and filth on the ground and around the building all the time, is the nests.  Pigeons poop in their nests all the time.  In fact, the nests are mostly disease ridden piles of poop from what I can see.

The poop dries out and combines with all the other junk in the nest and gradually becomes very powdery.  When the wind blows or anything disturbs the nests all that dust starts to move around.  It comes down the vent pipes for the bathroom.  It is sucked in through the air conditioner.  It filters in through the windows.  Basically, my apartment is full of pigeon poop dust all the time.

If you know anything about asthma, you can image what this does to my daughter’s breathing.  I can’t believe how much more often we need to do breathing treatments and use her inhaler.  It took me a while to figure out what was going on.  I just thought maybe she was growing or a change in the seasons or something.  Now that I am sure I know, I am going to the manager and demand that something be done to control the pigeons.  My daughter’s health and the health of us all is at stake.  They have to get rid of these nests and control the pigeon problem in the future.

You might say it is just my opinion and unfair to the birds, but you don’t live with the beasts.  I am sure that something can be done to control the pigeons and make this a nice place to live.

Nationwide Pigeon Control: 1-888-488-1415

Posted in Bird Control, pigeon control, Wildlife Control, Wildlife Removal | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »